Conferences: TESTING TRUTH

Poster

Apu ataieian: First peoples's resistance and opposition discourses against modern treaties. The case of the Innu. UQAM, December 7th at 6:00 PM.

 

Uetshit takuaimatishun: What research for an effective implementation of First peoples' self-determination? University of Montreal, December 8th at 4:00 PM.

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Full information:

Apu ataieian: First peoples's resistance and opposition discourses against modern treaties. The case of the Innu. UQAM, December 7th at 6:00 PM.

Pierrot Ross-Tremblay (Innu), Professor, Sociology department of Laurentian University

 

UQAM, 315, Saint-Catherine Street East. Metro level, classroom R-M120

December 7th at 6:00 PM

The Petapen group, acting as Mastheuiatsh, Essipit, and Nutakhuan band councils, has been negotiating with Canada and Quebec governments on a " modern treaty ". However, in spite of significant consequences on the Innus lifestyle and the importance of their bond with the land, non-transparent negotiations are conducted with only but a few members: band councils leaders, tribal councils, and law firms. No actual public debate was planned and Petapen interventions are closer to propaganda then actual communication with the public. For several years now, band councils have hired people to promote a treaty and Essipit is a harsh example of this reality. Campaigning "toward a treaty" happens to be a core concern for every Essipit council band communications. Nevertheless, with the beginning of negotiations, different point of view emerges. Shared by most of the Elders, it raises questions and concerns about the very foundations of the negotiations and the real value of such a "modern treaty". Internationally, so forth as nationally, criticized and condemned global territorial negotiations process happens to be a problem on various levels. The speaker will explain how what is presented as a form of decolonization is in fact a consolidation of colonialism and what could be the alternatives.

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Uetshit takuaimatishun: What research for an effective implementation of First peoples' self-determination? University of Montreal, December 8th at 4:00 PM.

Christian Coocoo, (Nehirowisiw), Coordinator of the Cultural Services on the Atikamekw Nation Council and researcher

Pierrot Ross-Tremblay (Innu), Professor, Sociology department of Laurentian University

 

University of Montreal, Lionel-Groulx Building. 3150, Jean-Brillant Street, Classroom C-4145

December 8th at 4:00 PM. Limited number of seats!

The understanding of education as a major player to improve the well-being of First Nations in Canada, more specifically new generations, reaches a general consensus. However, originating from those generations, emerging researchers argue the problem goes deeper: the historical exclusion of First Nations in scientific research in addition of their role as research topic is no longer acceptable. They rightfully understand research as a powerful tool against significant cultural, social, political, and economic challenges indicative of today’s colonialism. Consequently, facing these challenges, they ask for rigorous scientific research. As they defined above, a search based on their own necessities, answering their own epistemology, and contributing with concrete societal well-being oriented solutions. They call for justice and equity in the sharing of university research territory in Canada. Considering this context, what can we say about the actual strength of research to effectively give this scientific self-determination? What would that research by, for, and with First Nations look like?

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The speakers:

Christian Coocoo: He is Coordinator of the Cultural Services on the Atikamekw Nation Council. Christian collaborates as a researcher on several projects with different universities.

Pierrot Ross-Tremblay: Pierrot Ross-Tremblay, Ph.D. is Innu (Essipit), sociologist and professor at Laurentian University in Ontario. His research interests include memory and cultural oblivion, colonialism in Canada, and effective self-determination among First Peoples. Her book Thou Shalt Forget: Indigenous Sovereignty, Resistance and the Production of Cultural Oblivion in Canada will be published in 2018 at the School of Advanced Studies Press, University of London.

 

These conferences are organised by the Cercle des Premières Nations de l’UQAM and the Salon Uatik of the University of Montreal, in significant cooperation with the Centre Interuniversitaire d’Études et de Recherches Autochtones de Montréal.

 

For more information

https://www.facebook.com/events/210076696201534/

https://www.facebook.com/Salonuatik/

Date